The Great Gatsby Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis

F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

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The Great Gatsby Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis

Chapter 7 Summary

The parties at Gatsby’s home have ended. From time to time, automobiles pull up to the house only to realize that there is nothing there for them.

Nick wonders if Gatsby is sick, and goes over to visit. He encounters an unfamiliar servant, and learns that Gatsby has suddenly had all of his servants replaced by people who are rumored not to be servants at all. As it turns out, they are relatives who used to run a hotel, whom Wolfsheim wanted to help for some mysterious reason.

Soon after Nick’s attempted visit, Gatsby calls and asks him to lunch at Daisy’s house along with Jordan. The weather the day of the lunch is extremely hot. Gatsby and Nick arrive to find Daisy and Jordan lying motionless on a couch. When they arrive Tom is talking to someone on the phone, and in front of Daisy Jordan mentions that it is probably “Tom’s girl.”

Daisy’s young daughter appears briefly, but is quickly escorted away again by her nanny.

Later, when Tom is making drinks, Gatsby and Daisy kiss in front of Jordan and Nick.

Tom is clearly intent on showing that he is dominant in comparison to Gatsby, which creates tension. Daisy suggests that everyone drive into “town,” and Tom suggests that he will drive Gatsby’s car and Gatsby can drive one of his. Daisy insists on riding with Gatsby, while Nick and Jordan go with Tom.

Tom is enraged by the way the groups have split. He tries to engage Nick on the subject, but Nick plays dumb. Tom explains that he doubts Gatsby spent time at Oxford, and he says that he has people looking into Gatsby’s background.

Running low on gas, Tom and his companions stop at Wilson’s garage to refuel. While at Wilson’s, Tom is startled to hear Wilson say that he and Myrtle are planning on moving West. Wilson’s insistence on making Myrtle move signals that he has caught onto the fact of her affair, and Tom recognizes this. He tells Wilson that he will send over the car he plans on selling the next day.

Before they leave, Nick…

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