logo

46 pages 1 hour read

Cynthia Kadohata

Weedflower

Fiction | Novel | Middle Grade | Published in 2006

A modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, SuperSummary offers high-quality Study Guides with detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, and more.

Symbols & Motifs

Weedflowers

As the novel’s title suggests, the weedflower (also referred to as kusabana and stock) has particular significance to Sumiko. It symbolizes Sumiko’s resilient and unique personality. Sumiko stands out from the other girls her age; she loves the scent of dirt and doesn’t mind hard work. Helping on Auntie and Uncle’s farm is more than a requirement; it’s something she enjoys. Even her dream to own a flower shop someday revolves around flowers. In the camp, growing stock gives her a purpose and keeps her from going crazy with boredom. Like Sumiko, the weedflower stands out from others. It has a particular scent (which Sumiko loves) and flourishes even in the hot desert sun. Although other people don’t see stock as a desirable or valuable flower, Sumiko singles it out as her favorite.

Kadohata draws a connection between Sumiko and the weedflower not only in Sumiko’s love of the flower but also through Frank’s perceptions of her. Frank calls Sumiko “Weedflower” as a nickname, so consistently that his older brother thinks it’s her given name. When Franks sees Sumiko’s weedflowers growing at the camp, he tells her that the stock looks like Sumiko.

blurred text
blurred text
blurred text
blurred text
blurred text
blurred text
blurred text
blurred text
Unlock IconUnlock all 46 pages of this Study Guide
Plus, gain access to 8,000+ more expert-written Study Guides.
Including features:
+ Mobile App
+ Printable PDF
+ Literary AI Tools