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39 pages 1 hour read

George Orwell

Why I Write

Nonfiction | Autobiography / Memoir | Adult | Published in 1946

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Index of Terms

Aesthetics

As discussed in “Why I Write,” aesthetics of art and aesthetics theory centers around the emotional effects a piece of writing (or art) displays. Orwell claimed that, as a writer, he was more drawn to aesthetical elements such as alliteration, phonetics, and lyrical prose. In order to reconcile this desire for aesthetics with his perceived political purpose as a writer, Orwell’s aimed to use direct and clear language to convey his ideas while still using aesthetic elements such as new metaphors and original phrases. However much he enjoyed aesthetics, Orwell claimed that his political purpose as a writer came first. He was willing to sacrifice the aesthetic beauty of a piece of writing to argue for a specific political end.

Blimps and the Intelligentsia

Orwell used these terms to designate two ideologically opposing classes in English society. The Blimps, as Orwell defined them, were the latent military and imperial administrators that upheld tradition and acted upon patriotism and willful ignorance. In contrast, the intelligentsia were generally young, educated, and internationally minded academics prone to debase English society and who held little faith in the English government or its people. Orwell examined both the Blimps and the Intelligentsia for their role in perpetuating the wartime failures of the English Conservative government.

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